Fenton’s Friday Five

5. Instead of asking God to bless your plans, ask God (and trust Him) to build your plans. Far too often, we plan, and then immediately prior to implementing the plan, we ask God to bless the plan. When God is involved in the planning process, He creates plans that will build His kingdom, and He recreates us. God often uses the planning process to change us rather than using our plans to change others.

4. Engaged listening is more than just hearing the words people speak. It is understanding their intent, passion, and purpose as well. If you are angry, disinterested, or frustrated, you very well may miss what someone is attempting to tell you. Praying before you listen is as important as praying before you speak.

3. If your self-worth is dependent on what someone thinks about you, you have allowed him or her to become your god. Whomever or whatever you allow to be our god will control you. As Christians, our self-worth should be the direct result of knowing that we have been created in the image of God and that our character and conduct are being recreated through the Holy Spirit in the likeness of His Son. Knowing who we are in Christ is the key to healthy self-esteem.

2. If you have not read it or if you read it a long time ago, I encourage you to read (or reread) Basic Christianity by John Stott. I am reading it again this summer. Summer is a good time to review some of the basics and reflect on how they renew your soul and apply to your life now.

1. Best quote of the month: “Be where your feet are.” This quote is from a church member describing the importance of being engaged in the present. Our past is forgiven and our future is secure, so there is no reason not to engage and embrace this moment.

Make progress today by taking a step down the character path.

Gary Fenton

P.S.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath.

 

 

 

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Fenton’s Friday Five

5. The Bible tells us what we need to know not what we want to know. This is one reason we don’t read it daily. If Scripture told us what was going to happen next, we would read it faithfully. Instead of telling us what will happen next, Scripture teaches us what we need to become and do in order to handle whatever happens next.

4. For Christians, praying for our national leaders is a priority. (I Timothy 2)

3. Notifying your social network of a politician’s sins is less likely to bring revival than confessing your own sin to God. Unfortunately, our Christian subculture assumes that sending and forwarding e-mails about the spiritual and moral failures of government leaders are virtues. By our practice, we have changed the words of the African American spiritual from “It’s me, it’s me, it’s me, O, Lord, standing in the need of prayer” to “It’s he, it’s he, it’s he, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer.”

2. Societal change that is not based on spiritual transformation will only change who profits from the corruption. In a democracy, electing good leaders to represent the will of an unrepentant and rebellious people may bring a temporary uptick in morality but not a long-term turnaround of character.

1. To criticize the government for misusing our money while refusing to tithe God’s money is a contradiction. “Did you hear about the politician who treated our tax money like it was their own? Don’t they know tax money is our money?” “Did you hear about the Christians who treated God’s money like it was their own? Don’t they know all money and possessions belong to God?”

Make progress today by taking a step down the character path.

Gary Fenton

P.S.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath.

 

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Fenton’s Friday Five

Below are five questions that can help both your character and your soul:

5. Generally, do I emotionally react or thoughtfully respond to what happens to me? Reaction rarely leads to redemption or healing. While thoughtful response may not resolve everything, it is certainly a bridge to progress.

4. If your mind could only expand with thought calories, would it be healthy or would it be on life support? As we become more selective about what we eat, we should also be intentional as to what we allow in our mind. We need to carefully limit what we see and read to that which is healthy for or challenges our mind, soul, and spirit. Let’s begin a crusade for a diet of the mind! But, we can’t take credit for it; Paul started it in Philippians 4:8. Look this verse up, and read it again and again as you plan the menu for your mind.

3. Am I hoping for societal reformation or genuinely praying and working for spiritual revival? Most of us are unwilling to do the hard work of revival: genuine confession, authentic repentance, and the daily spiritual disciplines needed for change. We would rather vocally push leaders to reform our society through political programs. We call yelling at the politicians “political activism.” Spiritual revival, however, requires us to bare our souls before God in prayer rather than posting our preferences on Facebook.

2. Am I angry about too many things for too long? When you allow anger to stay for a prolonged period of time in your heart and soul, it will lead to destructive action.

1. Am planning on going to church on Sunday, or I am planning to participate in corporate worship on Sunday? There is a difference, and we will talk about that next time.

Make progress today by taking a step down the character path.

Gary Fenton

P.S.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath.

 

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Fenton Friday Five

This week’s Fenton’s Friday Five is directed to parents of children by guest blogger, Danielle Bell. Danielle is not only a high-energy Minister to Children, but she is also a lady with a deep and contagious faith. 

5. be still - the hectic month of may leaves many families weary and worn from schedule overload. so instead of allowing the calendar to dictate every moment of summer, why not carve out days where, as a family, your calendar is empty and you learn to be still? “be still and know that I am God.” – psalm 46:10 don’t over-schedule your summer where ”doing” dictates the days. if we are constantly crowding our days with activities, how will we and our children ever learn to simply be still and sit at our Savior’s feet? as a family practice the difficult discipline of being still.

4. creation’s classroom - get outside. literally stop and watch the sun set, run through a field, sit in the morning sun, and walk through the woods. my favorite is to lay on my back on a calm, clear night and stare at the stars. “the heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of His hands.” – psalm 19:1 create special moments outside this summer to point your family to the Creator. no indoor classroom can hold His glory!

3. screen free - we have become a people addicted to screens – tv, phone, computer, gaming devices, tablets, and more. set aside hours or days where the entire family commits to being screen-free and promises to be truly present in the precious moments of summer.

2. laugh and let go - when is the last time you truly let go and laughed? this summer, ask God to give you grace to quickly forgive, the joy to laugh and move forward, and the love not to judge and jump to conclusions. don’t allow the little frustrations of family to rob you of the gift of your times together.

1. intentional conversation - sit longer at the dinner table. ask specific questions on long car rides. look for “divine appointments” in the day to speak of Jesus and His great love for us. at bedtime, talk of eternal things, share concerns, and questions. the key to all of these is to wait for the answers and to really hear what your family is saying. allow the slower pace of summer to provide you with time to discuss what really matters with those you hold most dear.

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Fenton’s Friday Five

5. Best quote of the week: “People respond more to vision than need.” A Romanian pastor made this statement regarding how the movement to overthrow the Communist regime in his country gained traction in 1989. The Christian faith is about vision. “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth” is not wishful thinking but a passionate agenda for those who are experiencing spiritual transformation.

4. If you have no unfulfilled dreams for the rest of your life, there is no “rest of your life.” Your life, in some ways, is already over. Dreams do not keep you young; they keep you vital.

3. Best article I read this week: http://nytims/1uxlQtU.  Even though you may not agree with some of the opening assumptions, make sure you read the last three paragraphs. It will remind you that there are no solutions to major issues in life without love. Love is not an emotion to be felt but the Christ-centered life to be lived. The Christian faith is never irrelevant in solving global issues. Unfortunately the message of the Christian faith is often ignored by the political leaders when attempting to solve problems. The irony is that often these same poltical leaders have used the language of the Christian faith to help them get elected. Everyone wants to talk like Jesus, but few want to walk like Jesus.

2. More people watched the NFL draft this week than ever before. The Johnny Manziel factor was a major reason for the record television audience. His fans wanted to see which team they should cheer for next year, and his detractors wanted to see who became their new least favorite team. Here, in the collegiate football capital, we determine our professional football loyalties because of the personalities of the performers. While this is fine for recreational loyalty (I realize that some think it is a religion, but it is only a recreational game), don’t allow personality preference to determine your life principles. Just because a strong and winsome personality says it does not make it true. Base your values and life principles on revealed truth, not on revered personalities.

1. Knowing your purpose and position in Jesus is the foundation of Christian patience. For the Christian, the purpose of life is to glorify God, and the position in life is child of God.

Make progress today by taking a step down the characterpath.

Gary Fenton

 P.S.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath.

 

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Fenton’s Friday Five

5. Best book I read this week: Divorce Remarriage by Rubel Shelley.  This book provides some great biblical insights into an emotionally complicated subject. You may not agree with all of the conclusions, but the Q/A in Chapter 8 is worth the book.  When you read it, think redemption, not regulation.

4. Best blog post of the week: Autism and the Church by Amy Fenton Lee on TheInclusiveChurch.com.

3. Best leadership insight of the week: Leaders interpret reality. Visionaries picture what could be. Leaders without vision will only tweak and improve what is. Visionaries without leadership will talk about a bright day ahead when it is raining, but they can’t stop the rain. The real change agents in life are visionary leaders.

2. Best recent “eavesdrop”: While in a fast food restaurant, I overheard a mother say to her middle school age daughter: “You are not in trouble for what you said. You are in trouble for not listening to what I said. If you had listened to what I said, you would not have said what you said.”

1. Best, or maybe most interesting, paraphrase of Romans 8:28: “All things work together for God’s glory for those who love God and who are working for His purpose of ultimate redemption.”

 Make progress today by taking a step down the characterpath.

Gary Fenton

P.S. You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath.

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Fenton’s Friday Five

5. Recovery from bad habits, addictions, and sinful behavior always involves relationships.  Recovery obviously involves a relationship with God, but we often neglect that a relationship with God always connects us with people. The forgiven, Spirit-filled believer needs and requires the spiritual gifts of others. To live in isolation is to live in bondage.

4. Just because you are friendly does not mean you have relationships. To be friendly often describes learned personality traits. However, to be in a relationship means you have a responsibility to the person with whom you are in relationship. The previous sentence sounds awkward, but it is true.  Relationships inevitably involve responsibility. Many couples live together without being married because they want to avoid binding responsibility.  They are not in a relationship; they are in a cooperative housing agreement with benefits.

3. The dance of authentic spiritual life involves three moves:

  • Confessing sin, which means agreeing with God that you have sinned against Him, and that in Christ, you are forgiven.
  • Connecting with others who have experienced both dimensions of forgiveness.
  • Living in grateful obedience for God’s forgiveness and for His direction in your daily life. Among professing Christians, this third step is where the dance gets awkward. Many Christians try to live the obedient life without gratitude.

2. Best read of the week:  Unbroken (by Laura Hillenbrand). The movie won’t be out until Christmas, so you have time to read it before you see Hollywood and Angeline Jolie’s interpretation of it. I trust Hillenbrand’s interpretation more than A.J.’s.

1. Hope is our anticipated future reality.  As Christians, Easter is a picture of our anticipated future reality.

Make progress today by taking a step down the characterpath.

Gary Fenton

 P.S.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath as well as share this link (www.characterpath.com) with others who may find it helpful.

 

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Fenton Friday Five

5. Legalism is a dangerous drug for the soul. It provides you with a destructive self-righteous high which makes you feel temporarily superior to others.  However, in the process, it isolates you and alienates you from God. When you count on anything other than God’s grace for your spiritual worth and well-being, you are destroying your soul just as crack and meth damage the mind and the body.

4. When we choose to isolate ourselves from other believers, we are also isolating ourselves from the fullness of the Holy Spirit. All of us have spiritual gifts, but none of us have all the gifts of the Spirit.  We have access to the benefits of the all the gifts of the Spirit when we connect and intersect with God’s people.

3. Lessons from this year’s Super Bowl:

  • People do what they want to do. Many people waited in long lines to ride public transportation and sat outside on a cold afternoon in order to watch a very boring four-hour football game. These are the same folks who don’t like to stand in line at the post office, heat their houses in late March, cool their house on Thanksgiving in order to keep the temperature at an ideal 72 degrees, and then complain when church services last over an hour.
  •  The experience is often more important than the event. It was not a great football game, and most Super Bowls are not, but those in attendance will remember more about what they felt and experienced than what occurred on the field. This happens every day at work, schools and even church. As we seek to improve the experience, we also give an opportunity to boost productivity, increase learning, and more fully engage in worship. Improving the experience does not guarantee results, but it can eliminate barriers.
  •  Everybody occasionally has a bad day…just ask Peyton

2. The most common, negative, repetitive action (addiction) is making choices based on feelings rather than on faith. Most other addictions are the result of this addiction.

1. Twitter is often verbal litter.

 Make progress today by taking a step down the characterpath.

Gary Fenton

 

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Fenton’s Friday Five

5. Intelligence and spiritual insight do not decrease the need for prayer; they increase it. Insight and intelligence can be dangerous if you do not know how and when to use them. One of the more insightful people I have known has created chaos and confusion in every organization in which he has worked or served. Insight and intelligence without God’s direction are disruptive and destructive.  However, with God’s direction, they are helpful and healing. The more intelligent and insightful you are, the more you need to pray for wisdom.

4. Best read of the week: David and Goliath (by Malcolm Glidewell). This is the most faith-friendly book written by Glidewell. The following link will help you understand why: http://www.religionnews.com/2013/10/09/interv.

3. The anti-institution rhetoric is increasing in both religious and political circles. As people observe corruption in government and in the institutional church, it is becoming popular to suggest that both government and the institutional church are the problem. Some folks see the mismanagement of  government and become survivalist antichrists. Other folks are repelled by the hypocrisy in the institutional church, so they drop out and become spiritual survivalists with no church connection. While both government and the institutional church are often corrupt, a careful study of the Bible reveals how God has created and chosen to work through institutions. In the Old Testament, God created the institutions of marriage, family, national government, and then established a very organized (institutional) community of faith. An entire tribe dedicated to the priesthood sounds like a bloated bureaucracy. In the New Testament, God created the church. While some may suggest the first century church was not an institution, there were positional leaders,  organizational principles, and strategies for it to expand and pass forward to the next generation. Sounds like an institution to me. Flaws and corruption in institutions are not adequate reasons to abandon them. If you see corruption and mismanagement in the institutional church or in government, work to reform rather than withdraw. Anarchy, whether political or spiritual, is a serious character flaw because it is the ultimate cynicism. Think twice before you sign up to march in the anti-institution parade.

2. If you don’t trust that God is working in the mundane, you won’t trust Him to do the miraculous.

1. Here is a good trinity of truths you may want to repeat to yourself before you pray:

  • God is.
  • God is present.
  • God is presently active.

May you take steps down the characterpath today.

Gary Fenton

 PS.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath as well as share this link (www.characterpath.com) with others who may find it helpful.

 

 

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Fenton Friday Five

5. If you do not know where you are going, driving faster will not get you there. I don’t know about you, but I have found as a “sometimes recovering” workaholic that I substitute busyness for purposeful action. Adrenalin has been my drug of choice for most of my adult life; at one time of my life, I thought it was a virtue, not a vice. I was wrong!

4. “People who have difficulty forgiving are almost always people who have difficulty really believing that God has forgiven them.” Older and wiser people told me that back during the century in which I was young. Now that I am older, I am arriving at the same conclusion. I’m not sure why it has taken me so long to get there. Do you think it could have been because it was so descriptive of me? That is a rhetorical question, so there is no need for you (family members included) to answer that!

3. To only celebrate the birth of Jesus at Christmas is to miss the more significant issue. The Incarnation, or the miracle of God becoming flesh, is the heart of our celebration, as we acknowledge not only His birth but who He is.

2. Cynicism is a value issue. Cynics overvalue self and undervalue others.

1. Most radio talk shows are located at the intersection of arrogance and ignorance. The talk show hosts are traveling at a high speed on Arrogance Avenue, and the callers are driving carelessly down Ignorance Lane. They collide at airtime, and we call the result entertainment rather than an accident. Yet this week, I learned something from one of the broadcasts. A middle school football coach said that he had stopped defining excellence as perfection but as improvement. If his players improved each week, he felt he had an excellent year because with middle schoolers, there is no such thing as perfection. The same can be said for character in adults. None of us are perfect, but we can improve. If I am on the CharacterPath, I should have improved this week. Did you?

 May you take steps down the CharacterPath today.

Gary Fenton

 PS.  You are invited to follow on Twitter @CharacterPath as well as share this link (www.characterpath.com) with others who may find it helpful.

 

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